Saturday Excerpt – Immortal Relations by GD Ogan

“Here is the part of Immortal Relations, http://amazon.com/dp/B006ZCBT6G where Gary Logan has met the beautiful if unusual lady who tells him about his father’s time in Prague:”~GD Ogan

I was weighing the odds of meeting someone whose great aunt had known my father, and it seemed an unbelievable coincidence. “Do you feel all right?” she asked.

“Not really.” I said adding, “I can’t get over our meeting, but even more improbably that your great aunt knew my father!”

“Oh, not just my great aunt” she said “My whole family knew him; he was very helpful to them in recovering their lives after the war.”

Magdalena said her great aunt spoke English, could read and write it, as well, because her father had been a Czech diplomat in England before the war, and her great aunt had gone to school there. Her father had been recalled when he voiced alarm over the pacifist actions of England’s Prime Minister at the time, who thought he could make deals with Adolph Hitler. “Of course,” Magdalena continued, “history proved Hitler lied on paper about ‘peace in our times’ and then, when the Nazi’s rolled into Czechoslovakia, my great aunt’s father was arrested and shot. His wife escaped to her parent’s farm with my great aunt, who was just in her teens. Then Winston Churchill became England’s Prime Minister and when America came into the war, the Nazis were defeated! Later, my great aunt went to work for the new Czech government as an interpreter, working with some American’s who came to help. Your father was one, and it wasn’t long before he captured her heart and she his!”

Unfortunately for my great aunt, her lover was married and, as much as he cared for her, he was too committed to his wife and young son, as well as to his agency.”

I noticed her voice broke toward the end of her comment, so I knew she deeply felt the heartbreak of that lost love. She went on to say, “When the new communist government expelled the American’s, my great aunt wrote her promise to always be waiting on the back of this picture of your father.”

Advertisements