AuThursday – Your name here

img_0982We are getting to the end of the year and I’ll be looking for Interview Candidates for 2017.  

If you think this is something you might be interested let me know. 

I post Interviews every Thursday and Excerpts on Saturday.  I’m thinking of adding some new items like Wednesday Writer Space – More on that to come. 

I don’t do reviews or blitzes, as I want the readers to get to know the writer and what makes them tick.   

Reader make-up seems to be a mix  of Fans, Aspiring Writers, Actors and Veteran Writers.  This page if  viewed more as informative and educational rather than promotional. 

I’ll post the Clog Blog Results at the end of the year as I have in the past.   

Stay tuned next week for more writers. ~Tina

 

 

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AuThursday – Lourdes R. Florido

Please welcome published LGBT Author Lourdes R. Florido, to the Clog Blog.  Lourdes, how long have you been writing?

I wrote my first piece of fiction when I was in the 2nd grade. I remember it was a very short story about ants.  But of course it all started with a love of words and reading.  When I first learned to read I became immediately fascinated with words, driving my brother and sister crazy as we sat in the back of my parent’s car, when they were driving us somewhere, and I would read aloud every street or business sign we would pass.  That fascination was soon funneled into the books my parents would buy me and eventually into my writing stories.

Q:  What books have most influenced your life most?

I have five that I feel have influenced not only my writing but my interests in literature:

The Outsiders – S.E. Hinton

A Separate Peace – John Knowles

Wuthering Heights- Emily Bronte

Treasure Island – Robert Louis Stevenson

Lord of the Rings – J.R.R. Tolkien

The Outsiders and A Separate Peace cemented my love of “bromances”(if you want to call them that) and my fascination with exploring friendships between two guys which of course is a major part of Nicolas’ and Henry’s story in a Whisper of Angels, except these two best friends happen to be soulmates who are secretly in love with each other.   Wuthering Heights best exemplifies the type of historical romances I love. I’m a big fan of the Bronte sisters, Jane Austen, E.M Forster, Edith Wharton, Thomas Hardy, and others. The last two novels, Treasure Island and The Lord of the Rings touch on two areas of fascination and reading interests for me: maritime history and fantasy literature, both of which are reflected in A Whisper of Angels which is a paranormal love story.

Q:  Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t think I have one specific style, but with A Whisper of Angels, I tried in my writing to exude the tone that is found in so many of the 19th century classic romances I love.

Q:  Do you ever suffer from Writer’s Block and how do you move past it?

Yes, sometimes.  I have to get up and away from the computer and take a walk (preferably with my dogs) to see if a breakthrough of ideas comes.  I also try to skip forward to another scene that perhaps I’d thought about ,but not started writing yet, to see if that gets the words flowing.

Q:  What do you think is the biggest misconception in LGBT fiction?

Some people think that LGBT fiction is written only by LGBT people for gay audiences. While obviously it is for gay audiences, it can extend to general audiences too.  I’ve had many people tell me that they were surprised that I, a straight woman, had written a story about two gay young men, and then these same people having never read a gay story before mine, told me they were pleasantly surprised to discover they enjoyed the novel and the different genres it encompassed.

 Q: Would you tell us your story of getting “the call?”

I’m not sure what “call” you mean, so I’ll just answer it in a couple of ways and hope that will suffice. I you mean the call to write I explained it in the first answer, and would just add that the call extended itself into my professional life.  For a while I worked as a fulltime print journalist and now teach composition and literature.  If you mean “the call” to write LGBT fiction, I would say that it was my main character Nicolas who drove that decision. That’s just who he turned out to be – a gay young man in love with his best friend, in a time period when that would never be acceptable. Another influence was probably the fact that I’ve always had gay friends and experiences with the LGBT community.  It started during my middle school years with my best friend’s mother who was a lesbian who lived with her partner during a time when most people did not publically divulge their lifestyles.

Q:  What are your current projects?

I’ve been working on a historical romance set in Key West for a while.  But I’ve set it aside for now to work strictly on Book 2 of “A Whisper of Angels”.  It’s written from Henry’s viewpoint, which is challenging because he has a very different voice.  The book will wrap up a few loose ends that lingered from the first novel as well as introduces a few surprises from Henry’s past life.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

Look for me and contact me on Goodreads and Facebook:

https://www.goodreads.com/llrodrig1

https://www.facebook.com/lourdesrfloridobooks/

AuThursday – Adam Mann

Adam 200Please welcome Romance writer Adam Mann.  Adam, how long have you been writing?

I started writing historical novels in 1996 when I was working in Sri Lanka, but did not get my first one published as work got in the way, and I almost got entangled with a vanity publisher.  Fortunately I got my MS back, and didn’t pay the publisher anything before they went bang.

Q:  What inspired you to write your first romance novel?

I was always sad that history never mentions romance, which must have been there or they wouldn’t have produced heirs, so I started writing romance novellas four years ago, after I retired.   I call them novellas, as I get bored if they’re too long, and I don’t like padding my MS just to reach a word count.

Q:  What do you think is the biggest misconception about a man writing romance?

I don’t really know.  I have read a lot of romance books, and find that many women authors find great delight in things like fabric of a dress, which frankly I would find difficult to do – the softness of a lady’s skin is for me…  But I do like exploring the feelings and emotions of my characters in great depth.

Q:  Do you have a specific writing style?

The first novella I wrote was in the first person, but I’ve given that up unless I’m writing in the first person female.  I usually keep an Excel record of characters, places and chapters, which I find very help full.  In one book I started writing about a Clemence, but by the last chapter I wrote Clarence.  Thank you that editor.

I should also note that sometimes my characters change the plot as I write.

Q: To date which of your books was the hardest to write and why?

One book I had to wrestle with involved a man and his attractive step-daughter after his wife died. It was not so difficult to write but to adapt to the editor’s likes and dislikes, and I had to compromise with my hero seducing a college friend of his step-daughter.

Q:  What books have most influenced your life most?

My first romance novella has a lot of my own life experience written into the plot.  I’ve left it in for that MS, but have avoided getting too close to home ever since.

Q:  What do you feel is the most important aspect for all new authors to remember when writing or creating their own stories?

One of my concerns is authors who write about things they don’t really know about, and make it up as they go, whilst a little web search would have guided them correctly.  So my advice is don’t write about things you don’t know about.

Q:  What is on tap for the rest of 2016?

I’ve just published a new murder and mayhem novel – Chocolates and Cyanide – and I’ve got two romance novels in the draft MS format.  Two because one was delayed by a publisher, and then they turned it down, so I’m revising it.  The other I just completed a few days ago.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

I have two websites:

www.Lordmaity.com for historical novels, and

www.adammannauthor.com for romance novellas.

And on Twitter @Lordmaity and @adammannauthor and @Butterflybooks9

I think that Amazon.com offer nearly all my books and novellas, but maybe under different publishers, and some of them are more popular with Amzn.co.uk

Join me on Saturday as we read a teaser from Adam’s story, West African Heat. ~Tina

AuThursday – Glenn Maynard

Author PhotoPlease welcome Glenn Maynard to the Clog Blog.  Glenn, I have to ask, what was the most difficult aspect of writing Wayward Soul?

This story is a sequel to my paranormal romance book, Desert Son. The most difficult part of Wayward Soul was figuring out where to begin and finding paranormal elements that would WOW the readers like in Desert Son. Then I had to upgrade the side shows that occur between scenes in order to keep the reader hooked. When I was able to create that WOW moment, I knew that I had created something special that would rival Desert Son.

Q:  Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Wayward Soul is what one reviewer called a “stand-alone sequel to Desert Son.” You can read the second book and survive because much of the backstory is rehashed during the sequel, but it would do you well to start with Desert Son, and as an incentive, the Desert Son ebook has just been reduced to $2.99 on all online platforms, so now is the time.Desert Son blb cvr

Q:  Do you use any techniques, tools, or aids to help you write?

My writing process has changed with each book. With Desert Son, I wrote every scene on an index card, and then methodically flipped the cards over once I completed the scene. Wayward Soul was more of a loose outline with a list of scenes on a sheet of paper. For the third book of this Desert Son trilogy, in which I just completed the first draft, I started with nothing. I just wrote and let the characters take me wherever they wanted me to go. I was lost the entire time, and ended up writing my biggest novel yet (over 100,000 words).

Q:  How do you make time to write?

I stay up late at night or write whenever I can in order to reach my writing goals. One day this summer I wrote while on the beach. I took notepad and pen with me. It was great for my weekly goal, but terrible for my sun burn quota.

Q:  Who has had the most influence on your writing?

I believe Stephen King has a way of creating total darkness and doing it more effectively than anyone I’ve read. He creates tension, horror, and fear like nobody else, and I marvel at his ability to alter human emotions with his writing. I tend to gravitate towards his books, and I learn from his writing, so I guess I’d have to say that Stephen King has had the most influence on my writing.

Q:  What advice do you have for other writers?

Keep writing books. You will find that your time will be consumed by marketing your books, but you also need to keep writing them. It may seem daunting at first, but you have to budget your time between writing your current book and marketing your published books. If there is any time left, then you can live. How many words are you going to write this week?

Q:  What books can we expect to see in the near future?

I have finished the first draft of my third book of the Desert Son trilogy. Carter and Brenda are just trucking along, but I’ve created a wild finish to my series. I still have a lot to do, but it’s shaping up to be just as intense as the first two books of the series.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

http://www.glennmaynard.weebly.com/

https://www.facebook.com/#!/GlennMaynardFanPage

http://www.amazon.com/Desert-Son-Glenn-Maynard/dp/1612963129

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20505634-desert-son

Join me on Saturday as we read an excerpt from Wayward Soul. 

~Tina

AuThursday – Margaret Fieland

photo1Please welcome Sci-fi author, Margaret Fieland.  Margaret, do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Unlike many authors, I did NOT always know I wanted to be a writer. On the other hand, I always told myself stories, and I was a huge reader, especially of sci fi and fantasy – I picked the then fairly new Farmer in the Sky by Robert A. Heinlein for my tenth birthday.

As a writer, poetry was and is my first love. I started writing it in High School and continued on, mostly storing it in notebooks which I piled in the attic. At some point, I started writing more, and eventually wrote a poem I wanted to keep, started wandering around online, and things snowballed from there.

Q:  What books have most influenced your life most?

I’d have to say Lewis Carroll’s Alice books, which I re-read every exam time in college. In order to help myself concentrate on studying, I would make an act with myself not to go to the library. Then I’d start suffering from Book Deprivation and re-read  my copy of The Annotated Alice.

Q:  Why did you decide to write Sci-fi.?

As I said, I’m a huge sci fi fan, but up until 2010 I hadn’t written any at all. That September, I decided to devote NaNo (National Novel Writing Month, which takes place every November) to a sci fi novel. In spite of my friends’ advice to plan out the book in as much detail as possible, I wrote  about a page of plot notes and then devoted the rest of time to world building.

The resultant novel (which I completed, along with 30 poems by a poet I created in the universe of the novel) was pretty much of a mess, but I found out about an intense editing workshop that

was starting in January and signed up for that. I think the whole workshop took six or eight weeks, but I continued to work on the novel through the spring and finally ended up submitting it for publication.  It became Relocated,  the first in the Novels of Aleyne series.

Oh, yeah, and I never intended to write a series. I fell into that, too.

Q:  What is your process for writing a book? For example, are you a plotter or a pantzer? Do you start at page 1 and write your book sequentially or do you skip around? Do you start with your characters or the plot?

First of all, I’m by nature very sequential, to the point that when we still went to video stores for movies, I’d never get to watch the movies at end of the  alphabet because I always started looking at the A’s, that is, until I noticed I’d missed one of the Star Trek movies and started alternating looking backwards from the Z’s; then I only missed the M’s and N’s {grin}.  Left to my own devices, I start writing from the beginning, write the first draft straight through to the end, then stop.  This is not entirely true of some bits of some of the later Aleyne novels, where I ended up writing some of the scenes as homework for online classes.

Anyway,   I usually start with the characters and the initial situation. I plan the beginning, the end, and the major plot points. Sometimes I sketch out the first quarter or third of the novel’s plot in more detail, but in general, I’m planning in more detail a couple of scenes in front of where I’m writing. I generally have a good idea of what will happen (or what I want to happen) but not how. For example, in Rob’s Rebellion, the latest Aleyne novel, I knew how I wanted the conflict between the Federation and the Aleyni to be resolved, but I had no idea how I would pull it off until I was writing the end of the novel.

Q:  Would you tell us your story of getting “the call?”

The first novel I wrote (it was long ago accepted by a small print house, but has yet to appear) I wrote in response to the death of a friend’s wife and children in a tragic fire. Long after the event, it still haunted me, and I ended up writing a story about a little boy who loses his mother in a fire. I wrote the first draft in a weekend, but at that point I didn’t know much about how to structure and write fiction, and I spent the next year and a half learning. Among other things, I complete the Institute of Children’s Literature course. At that point, I started revising it, and eventually had it accepted for publication.

Q:  What was the most exciting thing that happened to you after you signed your contract – besides receiving your first check as a published author?

Realizing that other people actually wanted to read what I wrote.

Q:  If you weren’t writing, what would you be doing?

Spending more time playing music. I play the flute and the piccolo, but I don’t have much time to spare for it now.

Q:  What is on tap for the rest of 2016?

I’m working on another Aleyne novel, a prequel to the series this time. Some friends and I are hoping to put together another poetry collection, and I have a fantasy novel I want to get back to. And I’m hoping that my chapter book will finally be published.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

My Website:

http://www.margaretfieland.com/

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/MargaretFielandAuthor/

Pinterest:

https://www.pinterest.com/margaretfieland/

Join me tomorrow when we preview the trailer for Rob’s Rebellion.

~Tina

AuThursday – JL Wilson

JL Wilson also writes for Resplendence Publishing.  Let’s get down to it shall we:

Q: How long have you been writing?

I’m a professional technical writer and I’ve been doing that for almost 30 years. As to fiction, I started to seriously write in 2004 and I sold my first book in 2006.

Q:  What books have most influenced your life most?

Different books influenced me at different times. My mother served on the Library Board in my town, so she was a buyer and she let me help select books (what a fun time that was!) She encouraged me to read outside my age group, and I did so, reading a lot of mysteries and science fiction when I was young.

In high school I read a lot of classics. Then I went to college and majored in English and I fell in love with William Dean Howells, William and Henry James, and Scott Fitzgerald. Along the way, I read a lot of mysteries and science fiction: John Creasy, Anne Perry, Robert Heinlein, Frank Herbert.

I think three books that influenced me most are Outlander by Diana Gabaldon. I had never read a romance novel before reading that, and it opened up realms of reading to me. I read that book in 2003 and I realized, as I read it, that she wrote exactly the book she wanted and she got published. Maybe there was hope for me.

Another book was …And Ladies of the Club. This was written by an elderly lady and is a charming novel about life at the turn of the last century. Again: she wrote exactly what she wanted, persevered, and got published.

And lastly is Frank Herbert’s Dune. It was such a richly developed world with such strong characters.

All three of those books taught me to follow my heart in my writing and to write the story that I want to read. If I do that, the book will appeal to others.

Q:  What is your writing process? Do you outline, fly by the seat of your pants or a combination of both? Do you use mood music, candles, no noise, when you write?

I fly by the seat of my pants, mostly. I usually start with the germ of an idea. Here’s what I’m working on now: a woman’s late husband, a firefighter, was killed in a fire. His ghost comes back to haunt her when the investigation into his death is reopened. She feels guilty because the last words she spoke to him were to tell him she wanted a divorce.

Now: where will the book go from there? Who will the hero be: the late husband? Or the ex-cop whose wife was also killed in the fire and the man who requested that the investigation be re-opened. Where will it take place? When (spring? Summer? Fall?) Who’s the bad guy? Why was he killed?

What is her motivation for finding his killer? How will she manage her guilt? What kind of person is she? What are her habits, her loves, her dislikes?

Somehow, by the time I’m done, I’ve created the people, answered the questions, and had a lot of fun writing the book.

Q:  Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I tend to get sloppy when I have an idea I want to get on the page. I repeat words, phrases, or my characters will often sound alike. I have to go back through and tweak it, looking for my ‘bads’ – I keep a list of words handy and I search for those to change them. And I make sure to read each character’s dialog separately from other dialog, so I can be sure it sounds true to the character.

Q:  Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I don’t travel to do research, but a lot of what I see on my travels ends up in my books. I do travel, though, on book-related business because I attend several writing conferences a year, and frequently speak on panels and give talks.

Q:  How much research do you do for a book?

For my historical books (the History Patrol series) I do extensive research. Those books involve time travel so I have to make sure my details are correct.

For my contemporary mysteries, I have to do a moderate amount of research. I usually end up talking to someone in ‘the business’ – a firefighter, a cop, etc. And of course I love to search the Web and find details, etc. I keep all of that sort of information in a spiral notebook, one for each book and it goes with me wherever I go.

Q:  Do you have any advice for other writers?

I teach a writing class, and I try to stress that your writing should be enjoyable for you. It should never become a chore, because if it does, that will come out in your words. Enjoy what you do, make time for your writing every day (even if it’s just carving out a few minutes), and keep learning. You can always take online classes, talk with other writers, join a writing group – think of yourself as a Writer and act accordingly.

Q:  What are your current projects?

I had 11 books release in 2011 (see my web site, jayellwilson.com, for the complete list). Some were new releases, some were re-releases, and some were print versions of previously released digital books. So in 2012 I’ll be promoting those books.

I’m planning on a mid-year release in 2012 for Twistered, my Oz-as-mystery story.  I’m now working on using Winnie the Pooh as the basis for a murder mystery (yes, my mind works in odd ways). I’m also working on a new History Patrol novel, this one set in 1897 and it involves the assassin of John Wilkes’ Booth (the man who killed Booth—true story).

Q:  How did you come up with the idea for your “New Human” series?

The series began as a conclusion to a 6-book series I’ve been writing, off and on, for a year or more. That series is set in an alternate America, and when I mapped out the final book in the series, I thought, “What am I going to do with my villains?” There is a rival group vying for power on Earth and I couldn’t just kill them all off. So I sent them to a new planet—Delmorna.

Once I got them on the planet, so to speak, I had to decide what to do with them. That gave me an opportunity to address what I perceive as many social problems: racial inequality, law enforcement issues, and poverty. This was a whole new world I could design myself. And I had a lot of fun doing it!

I think that’s why it appeals to people—they see a lot of our current problems ‘solved’ but other problems crop up along the way. I think it gives people hope that by working together, the big problems can be resolved.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

My web site is a good place to start since it has pointed to other spots: http://www.jayellwilson.com.

Or readers can find me at Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/jayellwilson ) or Twitter (@JLwriter).