#AuThursday – Beverley Oakley

beverley-eikli-author-pic-copy

I was born in the tiny African mountain Kingdom of Lesotho, which is land-locked by South Africa. When I was small I emigrated with my family to South Australia where we built a two-story mud brick home and planted 25,000 trees in the wine-producing Clare Valley before I returned to Africa in my 20’s – this time to Botswana’s Okavango Delta – to manage a safari lodge. There I met and married a handsome Norwegian bush pilot who took me to live and work in 12 countries before we settled, a few years ago, in Melbourne, Victoria.

I write fulltime in between teaching creative writing interspersed with communications and marketing contracts, mainly for the Victorian government.

How do you make time to write?

I have to work hard at the discipline. When I was writing for traditional publishers I was given deadlines but now that I self publish, mostly, I have to make my own deadlines. Often that’s locking myself into a pre-order which usually ends with me burning the candle at both ends – such as now when trying to finish my work in progress, Devil’s Run. I still have at least 10,000 words to write in less than a week!

What genre are your books?

I used to call them straight historical Regencies or Victorian-set romances. Now, however, I find that there are multiple layers of plot and either mystery and intrigue with, quite often, a lovely, honourable hero and a heroine who has a blemished past or who is spoiled or needs redeeming in some way. I don’t consciously set out to write noble heroes and heroines in need of redeeming with either a wicked villain or a vain anti-heroine in the wings, but there’s often a version of that set-up.

So my books aren’t for readers who like a straight, sweet and uncomplicated historical. My biggest series – Daughters of Sin – is like a Regency-set soap opera with four different sisters – 2 illegitimate, 2 nobly born – lots of rivalry, double-dealing, mystery, a wicked rake being pursued for traitorous activities, and so on. I recently wound up the series with book 5, Lady Unveiled: the Cuckold’s Conspiracy, but intend to do a spin-off series of the various children – legitimate, illegitimate, secret, swapped and stolen – who have resulted from the five books in this series.

What draws you to this genre?

The inequalities between genders and the social divide, as well as the clothes and the manners. There’s so much scope for desperation to override good judgement and other rich plot possibilities when there’s not the social safety net that we take for granted today where no one starves and or doesn’t get treated at a hospital. (At least, that’s the case where I live in Australia so I let my imagination take me to another century when people couldn’t take health and not starving for granted.)

What are your current projects?

I’m nearly finished book 3 in my Beautiful Brazen Brightwell series. It’s called Devil’s Run about a young woman whose dying aunt may or may not leave her a fortune so she makes a wager to marry this betting man, both of them having very different motivations for wanting the marriage to go ahead (all about a horse) except that love gets in the way.

Are you an Introvert or Extravert?

Introvert.  How does this affect your work? I’ve forced myself to do author talks and, as I love making historical costumes, it’s less intimating to do an author talk dressed in a 1780s polonaise as I can then pretend I’m someone else.

What is your writing Kryptonite?

Porridge to get me going for breakfast, a glass of wine to spur me on after dinner and sometimes chocolate in between. I have very different writing schedules and as my husband is away in Singapore for six weeks at the moment and I’m between government contracts (plus it’s school holidays) I can write around the clock if I want – and as my next deadline draws near I have in fact got to work after waking at 4am.

What advice do you have for aspiring writers?

Never give up.

Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

www.beverleyoakley.com

Do you have a sexy excerpt you’d like to share with us?

I just grabbed this paragraph from my unfinished work in progress, Devil’s Run:

Perhaps in the glow of moonlight he saw the spark in her eye that reflected his own feelings. Whatever it was, something in his expression flared. There was a split second of arrested awareness before a subtle shifting in the mood between them, then the sharp excitement of melding bodies, arms entwined and mouths unexpectedly fused in a kiss. The jolt of something come to life within her sent Eliza into the abyss, her mind a mass of coalescing thoughts, her body a jumble of nerve endings.

Thanks so much for having me, Tina.

You are welcome Beverley!   Join me on Saturday when we read a post for Beverley’s Blog Tour! 

Banner The Duchess and the Highwayman

This interview was scheduled by: 

 

AuThursday – Your name here

img_0982We are getting to the end of the year and I’ll be looking for Interview Candidates for 2017.  

If you think this is something you might be interested let me know. 

I post Interviews every Thursday and Excerpts on Saturday.  I’m thinking of adding some new items like Wednesday Writer Space – More on that to come. 

I don’t do reviews or blitzes, as I want the readers to get to know the writer and what makes them tick.   

Reader make-up seems to be a mix  of Fans, Aspiring Writers, Actors and Veteran Writers.  This page if  viewed more as informative and educational rather than promotional. 

I’ll post the Clog Blog Results at the end of the year as I have in the past.   

Stay tuned next week for more writers. ~Tina

 

 

AuThursday – Annette Mardis

Annette Mardis author photoPlease welcome my fellow LSB writer, Annette Mardis.   Annette, a lot of writers are also readers. What book(s) are you reading now?

 I just finished Summer Rental by Mary Kay Andrews and That Chesapeake Summer by Mariah Stewart. Next on my list are On Sunset Beach by Mariah Stewart and The Summer’s End by Mary Alice Monroe. It’s probably no coincidence that all of them are contemporary romances that take place at the beach or at least near the water.

Q:  Do you have a specific writing style?

I spent most of my professional life as a newspaper journalist, and I’ve been told my style reflects that. I guess my writing is pretty straightforward. I try to mix in humor whenever possible because I love books and people that make me laugh. Author Debra Salonen said the dialogue between the two lead characters in my latest book, Shore to Please, reminded her of the old TV series Moonlighting.  I consider that a high compliment because I try to write snappy, entertaining and realistic dialogue.

Q:  How do you make time to write?

I work from home as a freelance editor, so not having to punch a time clock helps a lot. Also, I don’t have any children at home, unless you count my two dogs and pet parrot, so I have a lot more freedom to set my own schedule than some writers do.

Q: Do you ever suffer from writer’s block? If so, what do you do about it?

Yes. Setting the laptop aside and doing something else for a bit does wonders to clear my head. I’m a classic “pantser,” meaning I write by the seat of my pants instead of from an outline. Unfortunately, I think that lends itself to writer’s block because although I have a general idea of where my story is going, I’m not always sure how I’m going to get there until I place my fingers on the computer keys. Sometimes I think I’d be better off if I did an outline. But I don’t have the patience. As a full-time newspaper reporter and editor, I faced deadlines every single day and didn’t have time for writer’s block. Basically you sat down and did your job, no matter how you felt. I think that helped me develop a discipline that has served me well in my fiction writing career. But there are days that I sit and look at the screen and have no idea what to write. When that happens, you just have to force yourself to come up with something. The good news is you can always come back later and make it better if you’re not satisfied with it (and I never am).

Q: How did you deal with rejection letters, if you received any?

It’s discouraging, absolutely, but I just told myself that if my work was any good, somebody, somewhere would take a chance on me. I was lucky to have found a publisher, Liquid Silver Books, for the first full-length novel I ever wrote. So thankfully I didn’t suffer years of rejection as some writers have. Digital publishing has opened up so many opportunities for authors that didn’t exist when the only options were finding an agent to pitch the manuscript to a traditional print publisher. Securing an agent is in itself a monumental challenge. But thankfully you don’t have to have an agent to submit a book to most digital publishers today. And a lot of them specialize in romance, which is another plus.

 

Q: How did you come up with the idea for your “Shore” series?

I’m a believer in writing what you know, so it’s not a coincidence that the Gulf Shore series is set in Florida, where I’ve lived all my life, and at an aquarium. I’ve loved dolphins since I was a child, and I volunteer at a marine animal hospital in Clearwater where the Dolphin Tale movies were filmed. While I most definitely am not writing about the people, policies and animals at Clearwater Marine Aquarium, I have gotten story ideas from my experiences there, and I’ve learned a great deal about how such facilities operate. I also have done a lot of research about marine animals, and my husband and I have saltwater aquariums in our home. In addition, Shore to Please introduces a new character who is a newspaper reporter, so that’s another way I’ve used my personal knowledge of a subject or a profession to bring believability to my books.

Q: Which one of your covers is your favorite and why?

That’s a difficult question because I love all my Gulf Shore covers. Valerie Tibbs is my cover designer, and she’s done such a marvelous job on all three. My favorite book is always my latest one, so if I have to choose I’d say Shore to Please.

Q:  What are your current projects?

I’m working on Shore is Magical, the next book in the Gulf Shore series and my first paranormal romance. Kenshin Hamasaki, Gulf Shore Aquarium’s supervisor of marine mammals, who appears in the three previous books, will finally meet his match. Marina is unlike any character I’ve ever written, and telling her story is turning out to be a challenge.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

Website and blog: www.annettemardis.com/

Facebook: www.facebook.com/AuthorAnnetteMardis

Twitter: @AnnetteMardis48

Amazon: www.amazon.com/Annette-Mardis/e/B00E5UHPMM/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

Goodreads: www.goodreads.com/author/dashboard

Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/annettemardis/

Smashwords: www.smashwords.com/profile/view/Shelbypie

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=221177296&trk=nav_responsive_tab_profile_pic

Google+ https://plus.google.com/+AnnetteMardis/

YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCC1doptfvHDj7h7svO6ZtTA

Tsu:  https://www.tsu.co/AnnetteMardis

iAuthor: http://www.iauthor.uk.com/profile/annettemardis48:9290

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AuThursday – Marianne Rice

Please join me in welcoming my fellow LSB author, Marianne Rice. Marianne, we are so glad you could join us today. So Marianne, how long have you been writing?  MarianneRice

I started writing nine summers ago when I was on maternity leave with my son. My girls were two and four at the time. Needless to say, my writing was sparse, but my first attempt (I say attempt because that manuscript—that took two years to write—is the typical “first book”. Perfect heroine who has two perfect men fighting over her. Blah).  Since then, I’ve written eight books and am almost finished with my ninth.

Q: What is your writing process? Do you outline, fly by the seat of your pants or a combination of both? Do you use mood music, candles, no noise, when you write?

In my earlier days I needed to have complete silence so I typically wrote at night after the kids went to bed. Now that they’re older and less needy, I can multi-task and tune them out, but I do like to be alone. Music is good if it’s soft—otherwise I sing along and too many lyrics end up in my book. I don’t plot, but I don’t fly by the seat of my pants. I use my non-writing-time to think about my characters and their conflicts. I “cook” my story and am able to write quickly when I do get a moment to sit at my laptop.

Q: What do you do to unwind and relax?

Read. Read. And read some more. Preferably in a lounge chair in the sun.

Q: How did you deal with rejection letters, if you received any?

They suck. There’s no other word for it. I didn’t query my books for quite a few years because I didn’t want to deal with rejection. Instead I wrote. When I finished one book I started the next. My first few rejections were form rejections. Of course I was upset and didn’t feel like writing anymore. That lasted an hour or so and then I went back at it. Two years ago I received two amazing telephone calls, one from an agent and one from an editor. They were kind rejections, but these two women took the time to call me and give me pointers on how to strengthen my writing. It was so inspiring. That’s when I actively pursued getting published.

Q: Would you tell us your story of getting “the call?”

Well, even though my two calls I got were kind rejections, I consider them a prequel to “the call”. My first contract came through an email. It was six thirty in the morning and no one was at work yet. I opened my email and had to read the message a few times to process. I forwarded it to my husband and my best friend and then ran up and down the hall waiting for people to get to work so I could show them my email.

Q: Why did you decide to write stories that take place in New England?

Write what you know, right? While I’m from California and my entire family lives out there, I love the small town contemporary romances. They feel cozier and heartfelt.  People escape to Maine (aka Vacationland) to relax and write. I get to live here. The setting goes very well with the types of stories I like to tell: small towns and family dynamics.

Q: What books can we expect to see in the near future?

The Wilde Sisters series just got picked up by Secret Craving Publishing. The first book, Sweet on You, comes out in September with the rest of the series coming out in January and May of 2016. I’ve also started another series—set in Rocky Harbor, Maine—centered around a family of six foster children all grown up and looking to find their place in the world.

Q: Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

You can find me just about everywhere: www.mariannerice.weebly.com

amazon.com/author/mariannerice

http://www.facebook.com/MarianneRiceaut

https://www.goodreads.com/MarianneRice

https//www.pinterest.com/mariannericeaut

https://twitter.com/mariannericeaut

Thanks again for joining us!  Join me on Saturday as we read and excerpt from Marianne’s latest release, FALSE IMPRESSIONS. 

Until then, Be Naughty! 

~Tina

AuThursday – JL Wilson

JL Wilson also writes for Resplendence Publishing.  Let’s get down to it shall we:

Q: How long have you been writing?

I’m a professional technical writer and I’ve been doing that for almost 30 years. As to fiction, I started to seriously write in 2004 and I sold my first book in 2006.

Q:  What books have most influenced your life most?

Different books influenced me at different times. My mother served on the Library Board in my town, so she was a buyer and she let me help select books (what a fun time that was!) She encouraged me to read outside my age group, and I did so, reading a lot of mysteries and science fiction when I was young.

In high school I read a lot of classics. Then I went to college and majored in English and I fell in love with William Dean Howells, William and Henry James, and Scott Fitzgerald. Along the way, I read a lot of mysteries and science fiction: John Creasy, Anne Perry, Robert Heinlein, Frank Herbert.

I think three books that influenced me most are Outlander by Diana Gabaldon. I had never read a romance novel before reading that, and it opened up realms of reading to me. I read that book in 2003 and I realized, as I read it, that she wrote exactly the book she wanted and she got published. Maybe there was hope for me.

Another book was …And Ladies of the Club. This was written by an elderly lady and is a charming novel about life at the turn of the last century. Again: she wrote exactly what she wanted, persevered, and got published.

And lastly is Frank Herbert’s Dune. It was such a richly developed world with such strong characters.

All three of those books taught me to follow my heart in my writing and to write the story that I want to read. If I do that, the book will appeal to others.

Q:  What is your writing process? Do you outline, fly by the seat of your pants or a combination of both? Do you use mood music, candles, no noise, when you write?

I fly by the seat of my pants, mostly. I usually start with the germ of an idea. Here’s what I’m working on now: a woman’s late husband, a firefighter, was killed in a fire. His ghost comes back to haunt her when the investigation into his death is reopened. She feels guilty because the last words she spoke to him were to tell him she wanted a divorce.

Now: where will the book go from there? Who will the hero be: the late husband? Or the ex-cop whose wife was also killed in the fire and the man who requested that the investigation be re-opened. Where will it take place? When (spring? Summer? Fall?) Who’s the bad guy? Why was he killed?

What is her motivation for finding his killer? How will she manage her guilt? What kind of person is she? What are her habits, her loves, her dislikes?

Somehow, by the time I’m done, I’ve created the people, answered the questions, and had a lot of fun writing the book.

Q:  Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I tend to get sloppy when I have an idea I want to get on the page. I repeat words, phrases, or my characters will often sound alike. I have to go back through and tweak it, looking for my ‘bads’ – I keep a list of words handy and I search for those to change them. And I make sure to read each character’s dialog separately from other dialog, so I can be sure it sounds true to the character.

Q:  Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I don’t travel to do research, but a lot of what I see on my travels ends up in my books. I do travel, though, on book-related business because I attend several writing conferences a year, and frequently speak on panels and give talks.

Q:  How much research do you do for a book?

For my historical books (the History Patrol series) I do extensive research. Those books involve time travel so I have to make sure my details are correct.

For my contemporary mysteries, I have to do a moderate amount of research. I usually end up talking to someone in ‘the business’ – a firefighter, a cop, etc. And of course I love to search the Web and find details, etc. I keep all of that sort of information in a spiral notebook, one for each book and it goes with me wherever I go.

Q:  Do you have any advice for other writers?

I teach a writing class, and I try to stress that your writing should be enjoyable for you. It should never become a chore, because if it does, that will come out in your words. Enjoy what you do, make time for your writing every day (even if it’s just carving out a few minutes), and keep learning. You can always take online classes, talk with other writers, join a writing group – think of yourself as a Writer and act accordingly.

Q:  What are your current projects?

I had 11 books release in 2011 (see my web site, jayellwilson.com, for the complete list). Some were new releases, some were re-releases, and some were print versions of previously released digital books. So in 2012 I’ll be promoting those books.

I’m planning on a mid-year release in 2012 for Twistered, my Oz-as-mystery story.  I’m now working on using Winnie the Pooh as the basis for a murder mystery (yes, my mind works in odd ways). I’m also working on a new History Patrol novel, this one set in 1897 and it involves the assassin of John Wilkes’ Booth (the man who killed Booth—true story).

Q:  How did you come up with the idea for your “New Human” series?

The series began as a conclusion to a 6-book series I’ve been writing, off and on, for a year or more. That series is set in an alternate America, and when I mapped out the final book in the series, I thought, “What am I going to do with my villains?” There is a rival group vying for power on Earth and I couldn’t just kill them all off. So I sent them to a new planet—Delmorna.

Once I got them on the planet, so to speak, I had to decide what to do with them. That gave me an opportunity to address what I perceive as many social problems: racial inequality, law enforcement issues, and poverty. This was a whole new world I could design myself. And I had a lot of fun doing it!

I think that’s why it appeals to people—they see a lot of our current problems ‘solved’ but other problems crop up along the way. I think it gives people hope that by working together, the big problems can be resolved.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

My web site is a good place to start since it has pointed to other spots: http://www.jayellwilson.com.

Or readers can find me at Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/jayellwilson ) or Twitter (@JLwriter).

AuThursday – Temple Hogan

Q:  Which country would you most like to visit and why?

 Hi, its great to be here and to be interviewed by you.and to have the change to communicate with all my readers. As to what country I would most like to visit and why?  I loved Scotland and Ireland when I was there and would love to return there anytime.  There is a certain romance in the air.  I love the personalities of the Scots and Irish.  They such strong, gorgeous heroes and irresistibly beautiful heroines.  The first time we went to both countries, we took a train through the mountains and countryside which revealed the breathtaking beauty of both countries.  The second time we drove and had a ball finding our way down narrow country roads with their pull offs and sheep whichblocked the road.  Of course, I bought a ton of books in both countries and had to buy an extra suitcase to cart them home.  This was before the big hike in luggage fees.   I was so inspired, I wrote and sold two historicals when I got back. .  I just finished the first in an Irish Trilogy I’m currently doing for the e-book market, called LADY OF THE ISLE and have started the second, called THE NAUGHTY PRINCESS.

Q:  When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Easier to ask myself when I did not think of myself as a writer.  Certainly when I was little and my mother, first read THE WIZARD OF OZ to me.  I’m not sure I was even in school yet, but oh, how I loved Dorothy’s adventures and I remember thinking if only I could write a book like that.  When I got into school and my teachers told my mom about my writing abilities, that kind of sealed the deal.

Q:  What books have most influenced your life most?

You know, I wish I could think of something truly profound but the truth is GONE WITH THE WIND and JANE EYRE were two of my favorites when I was in my teens.  I loved the dark, mysterious heroes in both and Jane with her steadfast love for Mr. Rochester and Scarlett and Rhett.  Frankly, darling, I don’t give a damn.  Well, I knew he did.  He just had to.  And I certainly cared.  Those two books fueled my imagination further.  I know I could say  one mainstream writer, who shall remain nameless, influenced me as well.  Her book was so depressing and sad I vowed I’d never write a book like that.  I was dedicated to a book with an HEA ending, which are mostly romances!

Q:  What book are you reading now?

I confess that as much as I love romances, I also love Suspense Thrillers and am currently reading a Steve Martini book.  Some of my favorite e-book authors are Brynn Paulin, Bronwyn Greene, Abigail Martin, Jennifer Armintrout, oh gosh, I could go on and on.  Few authors I don’t like.

Q:  What is your writing process? Do you outline, fly by the seat of your pants or a combination of both? Do you use mood music, candles, no noise, when you write?

My writing process?  I tend to do a bit of both seat of the pants and outlining.  I can’t even begin to write a book, if my characters aren’t sharp in my mind and named properly.  That’s why a baby naming book is my most treasured research book.  If I’ve name my character Shelly and she’s really supposed to be Lucy, she won’t behave right.  She does things that just don’t go with Shelly’s role.  Some character just jump into your head full blown, like Billie Stone in Dirty Little Secrets from Ellora’s Cave.  She’d been left at an orphanage by her mother when she was seven, by the time she was thirty, she was pretty well off, owning her own building in downtown Detroit with her own lucrative business as a CPA, but Billie was really a con artist at heart until she met a tough, sexy detective who showed her a new way.  As you can tell my books are first and foremost Character driven.  Once I know who they are, then I consider what sort of things are going to befall them.  That’s about the extent of my outlining.  I go with the flow and let my characters tell what they’re thinking and feeling.  UNLESS I get stuck.  Writer’s Block is so debilitating to a writer.  That’s when  a pencil and pad come out and outlining a scene or chapter gets me started again.

 Do I use mood music?  I used to prefer silence until I discovered that the right music can mellow the mood of a scene and open up your mind to a whole new approach.  I mostly write during the day and I have a naughty little Shitz Tzu who distracts me.  I never use candles, but that’s a possibility I may yet explore.  If  I’m desperate to get focused I use chocolate, deep dark chocolate and pretzels.

  Q:  What do you feel is the most important aspect for all new authors to remember when writing or creating their own stories?

Get to know your characters.  Until you know them as well as you know yourself, you can’t get into their heads and without knowing what they’re thinking or how they’ll respond, you can’t make your story believable.  Characters, characters!  First and foremost!

Q:  Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Oh, my goodness, you can’t begin to learn how to write, without writing.  The more you write, the more you learn.  The process is so intermingled.  Learning to create your characters, finding a suitable plot are the easier part of writing, the fun part, but sitting down and facing that blank page which YOU are suppose to fill up with scintillating prose can be daunting.  As I said before, you just have to begin and force yourself to keep going.  That’s probably the biggest thing you learn in writing a book, that and the shocking, joyous revelation that yes! You can do thin.  Finishing a book is like losing 20 pounds and fitting into those old jeans.  That elation is what keeps you going back again and again to create characters and tell their story.

Q:  What books can we expect to see in the near future?

OH this is a fun question.  What writer doesn’t like talking about his/her creations.  In a few days, HER PIRATE LOVER, the second in my Pirate Booty Series will be out from Resplendence Publishing.  The first book, THE VIRGIN PIRATE was a bestseller at All Romance e-books. 

I’ve also just had DARK PARADISE, a funny paranormal out from Respendence Publishing and DIRTY LITTLE SECRETS from Ellora’s Cave.

Coming up are the third Pirate book, titled THE PIRATE BRIDE and the beginning of my Irish Trilogy, LADY OF THE ISLE, followed by THE NAUGHTY PRINCESS and finally, ENCHANTED ISLAND.  I hope to follow up with a sequel to the paranormal DARK PARADISE which is about vampires.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

 I can be found on www.TempleHoganblogspot.com and at www.TempleHogan.com

I’d love to hear from my readers.

AuThursday – Cheryl Dragon

Please join me in welcoming fellow Resplendence Author Cheryl Dragon.  Welcome Cheryl, so how long have you been writing?

In my head, always. Seriously, since my early twenties. If I didn’t write, I think I’d go crazy!

Q:  Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t know how specific it is. I tend to be more casual in feel and fast paced. I hate getting bogged down in tons of mundane detail and description when there’s so much to tell. My intention is to get the important stuff there and let the reader experience the story unfolding.

Q: Do you ever suffer from writer’s block? If so, what do you do about it?

Writer’s block is rare since I am constantly getting new ideas. The harder part is focusing on the book I need to finish and ignore the new ideas bugging me. If I can’t ignore the idea, I write down notes so I won’t forget it and then I can get back to the story at hand.

For true writer’s block, I’ll change to a different story. Since I write mostly novellas and short stories, it’s not a big deal to switch when one isn’t working. I always go back to a story. Sometimes the click of what a character wants just takes a little time.

 Q:  How much of your books are realistic?

Unless we’re talking about my paranormals, it’s all realistic. There may be a bit of a fantasy element to some people. Most of my writing is contemporary. I write a lot of ménage which some people might feel isn’t realistic in a long term relationship but stranger things have happened. BDSM, m/m, ménage…it all happens or we wouldn’t be so interested in it. I’ll admit, it’s not common but that’s what makes it even hotter.

Q:  Would you tell us your story of getting “the call?”

The call was actually an email from Ellora’s Cave. I’d been trying traditional romance publishers and it never worked. Everyone loved my hot love scenes so I thought I’d give erotic romance a try. Since then it’s been a wild ride!

 Q:  What do you think is the biggest misconception in erotic romance fiction?

 The biggest misconception is it’s all about the erotic sex. Or that it’s porn. Women’s sexuality has been repressed for centuries and this genre gives women what they want. The romance, the emotional connections, and the amazing sex focused on their needs. Here women get their fantasies fulfilled.

Q: We all know “SEX” sells, have you ever been asked to “sex-up-your books”?

No, I really don’t have that problem. Some pubs might ask that of writers to bulk out a book but I’ve never been asked to do that. I think most writers have a good feeling for the genre they’re writing and what readers want from a story. I want my characters to be happy, find love, and enjoy all the sexual exploration of that relationship. That’s a happy ending! So my heroines and heroes have a lot of great sex while building and exploring their relationship.

 Q:  What is on tap for the rest of 2010?

 My November release is Pushing Penny. A BBW BDSM:

Going to Italy with a sexy man should be hot but for Penny it’s all business. The plus sized designer of plus sized fashions met Grayson Raider at her best friend’s wedding, and now, he’s her bodyguard. While she doesn’t expect trouble, Penny’s rich Texas family is overprotective. She has no reason to protest—Grayson makes her feel safe and beautiful.

Grayson knew the moment he met Penny that she was the challenge he’d been looking for. Confident in her work, Penny needs to let him lead in the bedroom. His Dom side enjoys giving her pleasure and pushing her limits. Being tied up naked by a man she’s paying to protect her is hot enough, but when he starts using mirrors and fashion to drive her crazy, he might just push Penny right out of her comfort zone.

 Coming December 15th!

 Fly Boys

Ménage+

For Laura, dating Craig, an air force pilot, has been nothing but great. Bonding with Craig’s three housemates who served with him has been an experience in military closeness and deep admiration for men in uniform. The news that they’ve shared everything, including women, is arousing and a bit of a challenge. And Laura wants to take it on. The guys ease her into action, and soon, she can’t imagine life any other way—even if one of the guys is a bit reserved with her. But Laura’s biggest adjustment will be to their weird work schedule. Three months on duty and three months on her!

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 www.cheryldragon.com