AuThursday – Margaret Fieland

photo1Please welcome Sci-fi author, Margaret Fieland.  Margaret, do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Unlike many authors, I did NOT always know I wanted to be a writer. On the other hand, I always told myself stories, and I was a huge reader, especially of sci fi and fantasy – I picked the then fairly new Farmer in the Sky by Robert A. Heinlein for my tenth birthday.

As a writer, poetry was and is my first love. I started writing it in High School and continued on, mostly storing it in notebooks which I piled in the attic. At some point, I started writing more, and eventually wrote a poem I wanted to keep, started wandering around online, and things snowballed from there.

Q:  What books have most influenced your life most?

I’d have to say Lewis Carroll’s Alice books, which I re-read every exam time in college. In order to help myself concentrate on studying, I would make an act with myself not to go to the library. Then I’d start suffering from Book Deprivation and re-read  my copy of The Annotated Alice.

Q:  Why did you decide to write Sci-fi.?

As I said, I’m a huge sci fi fan, but up until 2010 I hadn’t written any at all. That September, I decided to devote NaNo (National Novel Writing Month, which takes place every November) to a sci fi novel. In spite of my friends’ advice to plan out the book in as much detail as possible, I wrote  about a page of plot notes and then devoted the rest of time to world building.

The resultant novel (which I completed, along with 30 poems by a poet I created in the universe of the novel) was pretty much of a mess, but I found out about an intense editing workshop that

was starting in January and signed up for that. I think the whole workshop took six or eight weeks, but I continued to work on the novel through the spring and finally ended up submitting it for publication.  It became Relocated,  the first in the Novels of Aleyne series.

Oh, yeah, and I never intended to write a series. I fell into that, too.

Q:  What is your process for writing a book? For example, are you a plotter or a pantzer? Do you start at page 1 and write your book sequentially or do you skip around? Do you start with your characters or the plot?

First of all, I’m by nature very sequential, to the point that when we still went to video stores for movies, I’d never get to watch the movies at end of the  alphabet because I always started looking at the A’s, that is, until I noticed I’d missed one of the Star Trek movies and started alternating looking backwards from the Z’s; then I only missed the M’s and N’s {grin}.  Left to my own devices, I start writing from the beginning, write the first draft straight through to the end, then stop.  This is not entirely true of some bits of some of the later Aleyne novels, where I ended up writing some of the scenes as homework for online classes.

Anyway,   I usually start with the characters and the initial situation. I plan the beginning, the end, and the major plot points. Sometimes I sketch out the first quarter or third of the novel’s plot in more detail, but in general, I’m planning in more detail a couple of scenes in front of where I’m writing. I generally have a good idea of what will happen (or what I want to happen) but not how. For example, in Rob’s Rebellion, the latest Aleyne novel, I knew how I wanted the conflict between the Federation and the Aleyni to be resolved, but I had no idea how I would pull it off until I was writing the end of the novel.

Q:  Would you tell us your story of getting “the call?”

The first novel I wrote (it was long ago accepted by a small print house, but has yet to appear) I wrote in response to the death of a friend’s wife and children in a tragic fire. Long after the event, it still haunted me, and I ended up writing a story about a little boy who loses his mother in a fire. I wrote the first draft in a weekend, but at that point I didn’t know much about how to structure and write fiction, and I spent the next year and a half learning. Among other things, I complete the Institute of Children’s Literature course. At that point, I started revising it, and eventually had it accepted for publication.

Q:  What was the most exciting thing that happened to you after you signed your contract – besides receiving your first check as a published author?

Realizing that other people actually wanted to read what I wrote.

Q:  If you weren’t writing, what would you be doing?

Spending more time playing music. I play the flute and the piccolo, but I don’t have much time to spare for it now.

Q:  What is on tap for the rest of 2016?

I’m working on another Aleyne novel, a prequel to the series this time. Some friends and I are hoping to put together another poetry collection, and I have a fantasy novel I want to get back to. And I’m hoping that my chapter book will finally be published.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

My Website:

http://www.margaretfieland.com/

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/MargaretFielandAuthor/

Pinterest:

https://www.pinterest.com/margaretfieland/

Join me tomorrow when we preview the trailer for Rob’s Rebellion.

~Tina

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Sunday Submission – Crescent Moon Press

“Now Open to General Submissions

Crescent Moon Press, a boutique publisher of high quality fantasy, futuristic, and paranormal fiction, is looking for both novel and novella-length submissions. We are interested in urban fantasy, dystopian, futuristic science fiction, steampunk, mind-bending time travel, space operas, mythological as well as historical retellings with a twist, epic high fantasy, and the paranormal. We are also interested in paranormal categories of suspense, thrillers, gothica, and mystery. Whether your characters travel by airplane, horse, or space ship, if the premise is powerfully unique, the voice unforgettable, and the writing pristine, Crescent Moon Press would love to consider your story for publication.

We are also accepting submissions in the Young Adult and New Adult categories.

Submissions to the Sabian Symbols signature line must have a basis in a zodiac based world and/or strong zodiac themed elements, plots, and/or characters driven by astrological influences. Novel or novella length accepted.

Please follow submissions guidelines below for technical writing parameters on all submissions.

Submission Guidelines:

  • We only accept new material-previously published submissions will not be considered.
  • Novel length submissions should be between 60,000 and 120,000 words, while novellas should be between 20,000 and 40,000.

To submit a manuscript for consideration, please email the following:

  • A one-page query letter containing a brief synopsis and any pertinent writing credentials, pasted into the body of the email
  • The first ten (10) double-spaced pages, pasted into the body of the email beneath the query
  • Send your email to: query@crescentmoonpress.com

We look forward to considering your work!”

Here’s a link to their website:

http://crescentmoonpress.com

Good Luck!

Tina

Sunday Submissions

Hello Readers, here’s another feature I’m adding for the new year called Sunday Submissions – here I’ll focus on Call for Submissions and Contests. 

Below is a Call for Submissions from Edge Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing

 

NOW OPEN FOR SUBMISSIONS

EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing is delighted to announce that the Professor Challenger Anthology, is now open for submissions.

Submissions close May 31, 2012.

EDITORS

J.R. Campbell and Charles Prepolec.

WHAT WE’RE AFTER

A broad range of new and original stories built around Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s LOST WORLD character Professor George Edward Challenger. Stories derived from the aftermath of events in the Lost World are welcome however simply revisiting or rehashing the Lost World without good cause is not. Challenger is a man of science first and foremost, not an explorer. Mash-ups or crossovers with public domain literary characters are welcome.

For inspiration think X-files, Quartermass, DR. Who, cryptozoology, aliens among us, supernatural occurrences, science gone awry in a Dr. Moreau, Invisible Man, Dr Jekyll vein, nature run amuck, monsters large and small, world threatening cataclysm, Lovecraft mythos, think H.G. Wells, Jules Verne, E.R. Burroghs, John Wyndham, Nigel Kneale, alternate history, new lost places, steampunk, whatever — Be creative.

Mine the potential for all it’s worth! Push it out there, get weird, play, have fun!

SUBMISSION DETAILS:

 

  • The anthology is part invitation and part open submission. Priority will be given to invited authors but an invitation to submit is not a guarantee of acceptance. A minimum of two slots will be held for open submissions. Acceptance is based entirely on suitability of story and quality of writing.
  • The maximum length for stories is 10,000 words, with shorter works preferred.
  • Deadline: May 31, 2012 – midnight).
  • Do not query before submitting.
  • Email submissions to: Charles@bakerstreetdozen.com
  • Emails MUSTcontain the word “submission” in the subject line, or they will be deleted automatically by the server. Please also include the story title in the subject line.
  • Submissions MUSTcome in an attachment: Rich Text Format (.rtf) or Microsoft Word (.doc) are the only acceptable formats.
  • Emails MUSTcontain a cover letter in the body of the email; for security reasons, email attachments with no cover letter will be deleted unread and unanswered.
  • Cover letter: include your name, the title of your story, your full contact information (address, phone, email), and a brief bio. Do not describe or summarize the story.
  • Reprints (stories having previously appeared in English in any format, print or electronic, including but not limited to any form of web publication) will NOT be considered.
  • Submission format: no strange formatting, colour fonts, changing fonts, borders, backgrounds, etc. Leave italics in italics, NOT underlined. Put your full contact information on the first page (name, address, email address, phone). No headers, no footers, no page numbering. DO NOT leave a blank line between paragraphs. Indent paragraphs. ALWAYS put a # to indicate scene breaks (a blank line is NOT enough).
  • ALWAYSinclude your full contact information (name/address/email/phone number) on the first page of the attached submission.
  • This is a professional market paying up to 5 cents per word plus a single copy of the book. Full rate to 7,500 words, half rate for balance to 10,000 words.
  • Rights: for original fiction, first World English publication, with a two-month exclusive from publication date; for all, non-exclusive anthology rights; all other rights remain with the author.
  • Spelling: the editors will consider stories using British, Canadian and American spellings.
  • Response time: initial responses (no / rewrite request / hold for further consideration) will be prompt, usually within fifteen days. Please query if you’ve not heard back within 30 days.
  • We do not advise that you submit more than one story.
  • Simultaneous submissions are not encouraged but are acceptable. Should you receive a “rewrite request” or “hold for further consideration” response, please indicate immediately whether your story is under consideration anywhere else.
  • Publication date: TBA (trade paperback & e-Book).
  • Email submissions to: Charles@bakerstreetdozen.com