New Writer – Orville Evjen

Tell us a little about yourself and your background?

I grew up in South Dakota on my family ranch. I am half native Lakota and Norwegian. My ranch was homesteaded 100 years ago. I learned to draw when i was real little. I would watch Saturday morning cartoons and try to draw what i saw. When i 18 my folks passed away and i moved up here after wandering around for two years. I created a native Lakota comic book in 1999 called Myth and Lore, but it didn’t sell. Later i wrote and Illustrated a graphic novel about Lewis and Clark and Sacajawea. In 2007 i enrolled in to Bismarck State college for graphic design, or commercial art. In 2012 i started researching for my last graphic novel on Abe Lincoln. In 2018 i self published Lincoln. In 2018 i also relaunched my line of comic books called Myth and Lore. 

How do you make time to write?

I am big believer in staying busy but also in keeping my nerves calm. I had a rocky childhood so now i work much better when I’m totally at ease. I exercise, try to get my sleep, and watch inspirational shows and books along with comic books. 

Do you believe in writer’s block?

Yes this happens when I’m stressed and tired. I try to avoid working when i am both of those.

Tell us a bit about the genre you write and why you love it.

I love fantasy art, but after working on Lewis and Clark and Lincoln, I have found that I love working on history based books.

How are you publishing your recent book and why?

Independent or self published. I tried for a year looking for a publisher but because my book was history the comic book publishers would not get back to me and a big publisher said its not the right book for them. So I went to Xlibris out of Indiana. 

Are you an Introvert or Extrovert? How does this affect your work?

I think I’m an introvert. It actually works well. I stay home and work. I do like to socialize some, but I’ve learned to stay away from alcohol and i do not date much. Not that i don’t want to date but with out bars its more difficult.

What is your favorite motivational phrase?

Off the top of my head I like the phrase

“You can crap in hand and wish in the other, guess which one fills up?” ~Grandpa off of Grumpy old men.

Also, I thought of a couple of my favorite quotes from authors other than myself

“Life is the greatest fairy-tale!” ~Hans Christian Anderson. 

What advice would you give to aspiring writers?

If you find an author  you really love then read everything they have done. I do more research than leisurely reading.

Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

Under Amazon and Lincoln by Orville Evjen. Also at my website www.bravecrowcomics.com  I’m also on Barnes and noble.

Do you have an excerpt you’d like to share with us?

I am assuming you mean from my book, So on page 161, I didn’t write this, but its my favorite quote from my book, Abe at the first Republican convention:

“In my opinion it will not cease until a crisis shall have been reached and passed. A house divided against itself cannot stand, I believe this government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect the union to dissolve. I do not expect the house to fall, but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing or all the other.’” ~Abe Lincoln

AuThursday – Danielle Teigen

Please join me in welcoming fellow North Dakota author Danielle Teigen.  Danielle, Can you tell us a little about yourself and your background? 

I’m originally from South Dakota, but came to North Dakota to attend college at North Dakota State University, where I earned bachelor’s degrees in journalism and management communication and a master’s degree in mass communication. While in college, I fell in love with the rich history of Fargo. 

How do you make time to write? 

I have two young children and am expecting another, so I write after they go to bed, in the morning before they’re awake or during my lunch hour in the daylight hours. 

Do you believe in writer’s block? 

I do believe we get stuck sometimes when we’re trying to get to the next part of our story or move on to another facet of the storyline. I think we often get so excited about moving on or making progress that we forget we have to finish telling the part of the story we’re on. 

Tell us a bit about the genre you write and why you love it. 

As a journalist, I enjoy researching and telling intriguing, true stories and that’s what nonfiction writing is. The biggest challenge with nonfiction writing is being able to weave together the facts while still telling a story people want to read, a story that comes alive not only because it’s true but because of how it is recounted. 

How are you publishing your recent book and why? (*e.g. Indie, traditional or both) 

Traditional. Arcadia Publishing/The History Press reached out to me to publish a hyper-local history book about Fargo, and then I pitched the second book about the Fargo Fire of 1893. 

Are you an Introvert or Extrovert? How does this affect your work? 

I’m actually both. I would say this serves me very well because I am completely content holing up somewhere to research or write for as long as I am able to, but I also really enjoy giving presentations about my book or talking with people about the research. Both are satisfying in different ways. 

What is your favorite motivational phrase? 

Done is better than perfect!

I actually do use that phrase when I’m trying to get words on the paper or the facts all in the right order and then I go back in during the editing phase to polish and refine the story. 

What advice would you give to aspiring writers? 

Make time to write whenever or wherever you can. When I was writing my first book, I thought I’d block off huge chunks of time to write and make monumental progress every time I sat down. In reality, I had to make time throughout the day or week to make what felt like small steps toward completion, but they all did add up to one finished manuscript. I also encourage writers who believe they have a good story to tell to sit down and actually outline their work. Yes, things may change, but I think having a general framework for where you want to go and what you want to cover in your story can be extremely beneficial, especially when it comes to staying focused and having good direction. 

Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

You can read more about me and my work at https://danielleteigen.wordpress.com/

Do you have a blurb you’d like to share with us? 

Fueled by ambition and pipe dreams, Fargo’s earliest residents created an entire city out of the dust of a flat, desolate prairie. Roberts Street might not exist if it weren’t for Matilda Roberts, a resourceful pioneer wife who encouraged her husband’s cousin to set up his law firm on that important downtown thoroughfare. O.J. deLendrecie generated so much success through his retail store that he was able to buy President Theodore Roosevelt’s ranch in western North Dakota. Oliver Dalrymple may have been the bonanza farm king, but the better manager was his rival, Herbert Chaffee of the Amenia and Sharon Land Company. Author Danielle Teigen reveals the intriguing true stories behind many of the most engaging characters and what continues to make the “Gateway to the West” unique.