AuThursday- Trevann Rogers

I see your write in the Urban Fantasy Genre, what draws you to this genre?

As far back as I can remember, I ‘ve been fascinated with the supernatural. It began with the I heard from family members when I was too young to know what they were. From there it was easy to move to tales of Dracula, the Wolfman, and other legends. Urban Fantasy is a nice combination of the two, taking the familiar creatures from distant past and far off places, and dropping them into our own time and culture. There is always the possibility of a new “what if” that brings another fantasy creature or culture into our path.

Which actors would you like to see playing the lead characters from your most recent book, HOUSE OF THE RISING SON?

Well, I love to see Jason Momoa playing any role but I think he would be perfect for Alexander. Cheyenne is tougher. Tom Cruise if he were younger ( is anyone sexier than Stacee Jaxx? Elliot Knight when he had longer hair? Or the late great Prince.

Tell us about the cover for HOUSE OF THE RISING SON, and how it/they came about?

I was lucky enough that my editor asked what style cover I was attracted to, as well as how I pictured my leads. I was allowed to choose the models and poses for the cover.

If this book is part of a series, tell us a little about it?

HOUSE OF THE RISING SON IS the first book in the series. Cheyenne just wants to play music but as the son of the ruler of the Incubi, he cannot escape his heritage. He and his children have a role to play in the survival of his race and circumstances keep drawing him into the family drama.

His role as single father raised questions. After Midnight, the prequel to HORS, answers some of those.

Where do your ideas come from?

I find inspiration in many places but most often in music. Either the melody or lyrics will resonate with me and ideas for scenes start to flow.

Did you receive any rejection letters, and how did you deal with that?

I did receive a few rejection letters but most were along the line of “paranormal isn’t selling” or” I just don’t know where this would fit.” Thankfully I never received any of those soul-crushing rejections you hear about.

Can you tell us your story of “getting the call”?

It was actually an email. Basically, it said, “I would like to offer you a contract.” I said yes. The funny thing was that within a week I got two more emails with basically the same message. That is a great feeling.

What advice would you give to aspiring writers?

My advice to anyone who wants to write is to not rush yourself. Learn everything you can about the craft of writing, learn everything you can about the business of writing, and decide what kind of career you want. Not everyone has the same career goals. Writing is not a “one size fits all” lifestyle.

Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

Find me at:

www.trevannrogers.com

www.facebook.com/trevannr

www.pinterest.com/trevannr

Twitter: @TrevannRogers

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AuThursday – Kathryn Lively

katlivelyTell us a little about yourself and your background?

I have worked in publishing for about a decade now, doing various things. I have written everything from books to greeting card verse, and I have worked as an editor and a publisher. Presently I write fiction – mystery and romance, soon to branch into more genres – and I work in romance ebook marketing.

What is the hardest thing about writing?

For me, it’s settling down and getting into a place – physically and mentally – to do it. When you have so many hands on your time, you tend to drift in other directions. I find I can’t say no when people want help, and I have to learn to be selfish.

What is the easiest thing about writing?

Once I get into a story, into the zone, I just do it. The dialogue and actions come to me, and the characters come alive. All it takes is a moment to get into the book.

How long on average does it take you to write a book?

It will vary. I’ve completed first drafts in 3-4 months; others have taken longer. My first book probably took over a year to complete.

Do you ever get writer’s Block?

I suppose I do, but I prefer to call it Writer’s Fatigue. There are days where I don’t write simply because I don’t have the mental energy. It happens usually after I’ve finished a big project. I have to take some time off to recharge.

Did you receive any rejection letters, and if so how did you handle them?

Oh, yes. I could paper a house with them. In the beginning, it used to upset me, but now it’s part of the circle of a writer’s life. I find not all the rejections are based on the quality of writing; there are different factors at play.

Can you tell us your story of getting the call?

It’s kind of a bittersweet story – this was in the late 90s. I had submitted an inspirational novel to a new publisher looking for work. I actually received a phone call with the offer to publish. The publisher was very nice and enthusiastic. I recall I was happy because earlier I had an “almost” but ultimately the first publisher couldn’t get the funding.

After my book came out, however, I soon learn the publisher I went with lacked experience and reneged on a number of points. After 9/11 they decided to shut down altogether and I never got my final royalty check.

What advice would you give to aspiring writers?

Write, revise, write. Think of publishing as a marathon, not a sprint. Your time will come.

Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

Subscribe to Kathryn Lively’s mailing list for news on eBook sales and new releases from Kat and other romance authors. Copy and paste to join:  http://eepurl.com/bq-RML

Visit Kat Online!

Website: www.KathrynLively.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/kathrynlively

Twitter: www.twitter.com/MsKathrynLively

Goodreads: www.goodreads.com/KathrynLively

Join me on Saturday when we read an excerpt from Kathryn’s latest release, “Finish What you Started” ~Tina

AuThursday-Susan Behon

Behon_Susan_Author_PicPlease welcome my fellow LSB author Susan Behon.  Susan welcome to the Clog Blog, how long have you been writing?

I started writing bad poetry in high school and moved on to fan fiction when I was in my twenties. It took quite a few years to gather my courage and pursue writing seriously.

Q: How do you develop your plots and characters? Do you use any set formula?

The fact that I write a series has helped with plot and character development. I started out with one couple and the side characters from that story got their own romance. New characters were introduced and the series took on a life of its own from there. As odd as it sounds, characters and plots just come to me. Some characters are based on a mishmash of people I know and some are completely from my imagination.

Q: What were your feelings when your first novel, FALL FOR YOU was accepted and when you first saw the cover of the finished product?

I received the acceptance e-mail at three in the morning. I half-hyperventilated and half-cried out from excitement. My husband was asleep next to me and the walrus-like howl woke him up. Bless, his heart. He hugged me and told me that he knew I would make it. I was overjoyed and stunned to have a contract offer.

When I saw the first cover for FALL FOR YOU I felt like I’d finally made it. It sank in that I actually have a real book on my hands.

Q: How did you come up with the idea for the MADISON FALLS series?

I wrote the first book as a challenge to myself to see if I could actually do it. I thought it would be one and done. The first book opened the flood gates to more ideas and I ran with it. Funny bit of trivia—when I was brainstorming for an idea for the town, I was stuck. I listed name after name and then my daughter, Madison, tripped in front of me. That is how I dubbed my series, “Madison Falls.”

Q: To date which of your books was the hardest to write and why?

I’m presently having the most trouble with the manuscript for book six, ALL FIRED UP. I think it’s due to the fact that I’m thinking about it too hard. Each time I write a book, I want to improve and make it the best book yet. Sometimes, putting that kind of pressure on myself squelches the creative process.

Q:  When you are writing, who is in control? You or your characters?

I would have to say that my characters have the lion’s share of control. I’ll write, intending to go in one direction and they’ll grab the reins and pull me somewhere completely different.

Q:  Do you have any advice for other writers?

Start out by writing what you know. Write what you want to express and not what you think others want to read. You can do it and you are good enough. Writers are world builders. Don’t be afraid to make the world that’s waiting inside of you.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

www.susanbehon.com

Twitter: www.twitter.com/suebeehny

Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1dD86dc

Goodreads: http://bit.ly/1GFiuI

Amazon Author: http://amzn.to/1zn8Igz

Link to All Books: http://amzn.to/1JepnEA

 

Join me on Saturday when we read an excerpt from Susan’s latest novel, ALL OR NOTHING.  ~Tina

 

 

AuThursday – Lourdes R. Florido

Please welcome published LGBT Author Lourdes R. Florido, to the Clog Blog.  Lourdes, how long have you been writing?

I wrote my first piece of fiction when I was in the 2nd grade. I remember it was a very short story about ants.  But of course it all started with a love of words and reading.  When I first learned to read I became immediately fascinated with words, driving my brother and sister crazy as we sat in the back of my parent’s car, when they were driving us somewhere, and I would read aloud every street or business sign we would pass.  That fascination was soon funneled into the books my parents would buy me and eventually into my writing stories.

Q:  What books have most influenced your life most?

I have five that I feel have influenced not only my writing but my interests in literature:

The Outsiders – S.E. Hinton

A Separate Peace – John Knowles

Wuthering Heights- Emily Bronte

Treasure Island – Robert Louis Stevenson

Lord of the Rings – J.R.R. Tolkien

The Outsiders and A Separate Peace cemented my love of “bromances”(if you want to call them that) and my fascination with exploring friendships between two guys which of course is a major part of Nicolas’ and Henry’s story in a Whisper of Angels, except these two best friends happen to be soulmates who are secretly in love with each other.   Wuthering Heights best exemplifies the type of historical romances I love. I’m a big fan of the Bronte sisters, Jane Austen, E.M Forster, Edith Wharton, Thomas Hardy, and others. The last two novels, Treasure Island and The Lord of the Rings touch on two areas of fascination and reading interests for me: maritime history and fantasy literature, both of which are reflected in A Whisper of Angels which is a paranormal love story.

Q:  Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t think I have one specific style, but with A Whisper of Angels, I tried in my writing to exude the tone that is found in so many of the 19th century classic romances I love.

Q:  Do you ever suffer from Writer’s Block and how do you move past it?

Yes, sometimes.  I have to get up and away from the computer and take a walk (preferably with my dogs) to see if a breakthrough of ideas comes.  I also try to skip forward to another scene that perhaps I’d thought about ,but not started writing yet, to see if that gets the words flowing.

Q:  What do you think is the biggest misconception in LGBT fiction?

Some people think that LGBT fiction is written only by LGBT people for gay audiences. While obviously it is for gay audiences, it can extend to general audiences too.  I’ve had many people tell me that they were surprised that I, a straight woman, had written a story about two gay young men, and then these same people having never read a gay story before mine, told me they were pleasantly surprised to discover they enjoyed the novel and the different genres it encompassed.

 Q: Would you tell us your story of getting “the call?”

I’m not sure what “call” you mean, so I’ll just answer it in a couple of ways and hope that will suffice. I you mean the call to write I explained it in the first answer, and would just add that the call extended itself into my professional life.  For a while I worked as a fulltime print journalist and now teach composition and literature.  If you mean “the call” to write LGBT fiction, I would say that it was my main character Nicolas who drove that decision. That’s just who he turned out to be – a gay young man in love with his best friend, in a time period when that would never be acceptable. Another influence was probably the fact that I’ve always had gay friends and experiences with the LGBT community.  It started during my middle school years with my best friend’s mother who was a lesbian who lived with her partner during a time when most people did not publically divulge their lifestyles.

Q:  What are your current projects?

I’ve been working on a historical romance set in Key West for a while.  But I’ve set it aside for now to work strictly on Book 2 of “A Whisper of Angels”.  It’s written from Henry’s viewpoint, which is challenging because he has a very different voice.  The book will wrap up a few loose ends that lingered from the first novel as well as introduces a few surprises from Henry’s past life.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

Look for me and contact me on Goodreads and Facebook:

https://www.goodreads.com/llrodrig1

https://www.facebook.com/lourdesrfloridobooks/

AuThursday – Kara O’Neal

Kara (1 of 1)Please welcome my fellow Resplendence writer,  Kara O’Neal, to the Clog Blog.  Kara,  How long have you been writing?

I wrote my first novel when I was pregnant with my oldest child, so I’ve been writing almost sixteen years.

Q:  Do you have a specific writing style?

I’m not really sure. I write where the characters take me. Sometimes I’m more descriptive than usual or sometimes I find I’m writing wittier conversations. I never know what’s gonna end up on the page.

Q : Do you ever suffer from writer’s block?

So far I haven’t faced that terrible situation. I’m sure I will, but right now I’m lucky to have created a town that has a variety of characters. These people keep leading me down roads that allow my imagination to run free. It’s been a lot of fun!

Q: How did you deal with rejection letters, if you received any?

I received several rejections. The first was hard, and the next dozen or so were even harder. I didn’t know what I was doing wrong, and I couldn’t figure out how to fix it. I’m sad to say I did stop sending my manuscript to people. I didn’t quit writing, but I did quit trying to get published. It was hard to keep submitting when I felt like I was sending out poor material. I finally started entering contests and the suggestions, comments, etc. I received helped a lot. I also found a critique group, which was the scariest thing I’d ever done, but it paid off. I became a better writer because of these things, and it only took one year for me to find a publisher who liked my work.

Q:  Would you tell us your story of getting “the call?”

Oh, what a day that was! When I read the email from Resplendence Publishing indicating they wanted me, me, to write for them, I promise I sat in silence for probably thirty seconds and blinked at the screen. Then I rushed to my husband and made him come read it. I was so afraid I was misinterpreting the communication. When it finally sank in, I called my siblings first. They are my inspirations and my biggest fans. Then I called my parents, and made my dad promise he wouldn’t ever read any of my books. They are romance, after all! (He has completely ignored my command and read every single one of my books.)

Q:  How did you come up with the idea for the PIKES RUN series?

TRR The Sheriff's Gift

TRR CowboysCharmsTRR MillerBridesSaving Sarah TRR

 

 

 

 

I wanted to write stories about a family. One that lived, laughed and loved as mine does. Several of my characters are based off of people I know, and they are perfect models for the Lonnigan and Davis families. Many of my favorite scenes are when they’re sharing a Sunday meal and teasing each other.

Q: To date which of your books was the hardest to write and why?TRR Welcome Home

Without a doubt the hardest to write was my first, Welcome Home, simply because it was my first. I was trying to figure out how to write along with finding my voice. I can tell you it was difficult, but I kept writing. And rewriting. And rewriting some more.

Q:  What are your current projects?

I’m about to send book seven, Love’s Redemption, to my editor and book eight, The Editor’s Kisses, is going through the critique process. I’ll start book nine, The Ranger’s Vow, this week.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

Many places!

My website: www.karaoneal.com.

My facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/KaraONeal84/

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/karaoneal7/

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Kara-ONeal/e/B00FL19TH8/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1465007993&sr=8-1

Barnes and Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/kara+o’neal?_requestid=845025

Twitter: https://twitter.com/KaraONealAuthor.

Join me on Saturday when we read a sexy teaser from Kara’s book Love’s Promise. ~Tina

AuThursday – Margaret Fieland

photo1Please welcome Sci-fi author, Margaret Fieland.  Margaret, do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Unlike many authors, I did NOT always know I wanted to be a writer. On the other hand, I always told myself stories, and I was a huge reader, especially of sci fi and fantasy – I picked the then fairly new Farmer in the Sky by Robert A. Heinlein for my tenth birthday.

As a writer, poetry was and is my first love. I started writing it in High School and continued on, mostly storing it in notebooks which I piled in the attic. At some point, I started writing more, and eventually wrote a poem I wanted to keep, started wandering around online, and things snowballed from there.

Q:  What books have most influenced your life most?

I’d have to say Lewis Carroll’s Alice books, which I re-read every exam time in college. In order to help myself concentrate on studying, I would make an act with myself not to go to the library. Then I’d start suffering from Book Deprivation and re-read  my copy of The Annotated Alice.

Q:  Why did you decide to write Sci-fi.?

As I said, I’m a huge sci fi fan, but up until 2010 I hadn’t written any at all. That September, I decided to devote NaNo (National Novel Writing Month, which takes place every November) to a sci fi novel. In spite of my friends’ advice to plan out the book in as much detail as possible, I wrote  about a page of plot notes and then devoted the rest of time to world building.

The resultant novel (which I completed, along with 30 poems by a poet I created in the universe of the novel) was pretty much of a mess, but I found out about an intense editing workshop that

was starting in January and signed up for that. I think the whole workshop took six or eight weeks, but I continued to work on the novel through the spring and finally ended up submitting it for publication.  It became Relocated,  the first in the Novels of Aleyne series.

Oh, yeah, and I never intended to write a series. I fell into that, too.

Q:  What is your process for writing a book? For example, are you a plotter or a pantzer? Do you start at page 1 and write your book sequentially or do you skip around? Do you start with your characters or the plot?

First of all, I’m by nature very sequential, to the point that when we still went to video stores for movies, I’d never get to watch the movies at end of the  alphabet because I always started looking at the A’s, that is, until I noticed I’d missed one of the Star Trek movies and started alternating looking backwards from the Z’s; then I only missed the M’s and N’s {grin}.  Left to my own devices, I start writing from the beginning, write the first draft straight through to the end, then stop.  This is not entirely true of some bits of some of the later Aleyne novels, where I ended up writing some of the scenes as homework for online classes.

Anyway,   I usually start with the characters and the initial situation. I plan the beginning, the end, and the major plot points. Sometimes I sketch out the first quarter or third of the novel’s plot in more detail, but in general, I’m planning in more detail a couple of scenes in front of where I’m writing. I generally have a good idea of what will happen (or what I want to happen) but not how. For example, in Rob’s Rebellion, the latest Aleyne novel, I knew how I wanted the conflict between the Federation and the Aleyni to be resolved, but I had no idea how I would pull it off until I was writing the end of the novel.

Q:  Would you tell us your story of getting “the call?”

The first novel I wrote (it was long ago accepted by a small print house, but has yet to appear) I wrote in response to the death of a friend’s wife and children in a tragic fire. Long after the event, it still haunted me, and I ended up writing a story about a little boy who loses his mother in a fire. I wrote the first draft in a weekend, but at that point I didn’t know much about how to structure and write fiction, and I spent the next year and a half learning. Among other things, I complete the Institute of Children’s Literature course. At that point, I started revising it, and eventually had it accepted for publication.

Q:  What was the most exciting thing that happened to you after you signed your contract – besides receiving your first check as a published author?

Realizing that other people actually wanted to read what I wrote.

Q:  If you weren’t writing, what would you be doing?

Spending more time playing music. I play the flute and the piccolo, but I don’t have much time to spare for it now.

Q:  What is on tap for the rest of 2016?

I’m working on another Aleyne novel, a prequel to the series this time. Some friends and I are hoping to put together another poetry collection, and I have a fantasy novel I want to get back to. And I’m hoping that my chapter book will finally be published.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

My Website:

http://www.margaretfieland.com/

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/MargaretFielandAuthor/

Pinterest:

https://www.pinterest.com/margaretfieland/

Join me tomorrow when we preview the trailer for Rob’s Rebellion.

~Tina

AuThursday – Bella J

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Please welcome my fellow LSB author, Bella J Bella,  can you tell us where you hail from?

Hi, Tina, and thank you so much for hosting me.  I hail from the sunny city of Cape Town, South Africa—also known as the Cape of Storms and home of the beautiful Table Mountain.  People here in Cape Town—including me—always seem to be in vacation mode, especially during summer.  In winter we just hide and wish we could hibernate.  There’s a reason Cape Town is also known as the Cape of Storms.

Q: Tell us your latest news?

Resplendent Rush (Resplendence #2) is due for release on January 11th 2016, and I can’t wait for Lexi and Levi’s story to be out there.  I had so much fun writing this novel and putting these two characters together.  Rush is a fast paced, funny, hot and heartwarming story of two people finding love when they really weren’t looking for it.  They are two opposites, but whenever they are together it’s explosive.

Resplendent Rage (Resplendence #3) just got signed up, and is scheduled for release in March 2016.  Rage is a romantic suspense, but old characters are sure to make an appearance to bring a little ‘funny’ into the mix. 😉

Q: What inspired you to write your first book?

I can’t say that there was one specific thing that inspired me to write Resplendent Ruin, but I had this image of a sophisticated, refined and reserved character in my head—Juliette—and she just kept on pacing around in my mind for months. So eventually I started thinking that what if I throw a bad-boy, tattooed, biker with attitude in Juliette’s way?  How would she react to a beer drinking, cocky, arrogant man that hates responsibilities?  And when Knox’s image started floating around in my head, I just knew this was a story that needed to be told.  But since I love drama so much, I decided to add an ambitious, sophisticated, classy and stylish fiancé who from the outside seems perfect for Juliette.  That’s how Daniel became part of the story, and a very emotional love triangle was born.

Q: How did you come up with the title?

Coming up with the title was easy.  I knew I wanted ‘Ruin’ in there somewhere and I’ve always liked the word ‘Resplendent.’  If you ask me, it’s a word that doesn’t get used nearly enough.  When those two words got added together, I knew I was the perfect title for the story.

Q:  What is your writing process? Do you outline, fly by the seat of your pants or a combination of both? Do you use mood music, candles, no noise, when you write?

I don’t outline—at all.  Usually I start out with a character in my head, and I always know how I want that character’s story to end.  So I basically start with a hero or heroine—or sometimes both—and then an ending.  The rest in between consists of 80% ‘fly by the seat of my pants’ writing, while 20% is more planned to fit into the plot.  A lot of my scenes—especially the love scenes—I get my inspiration from music.  But other than that, I just write when I get the time. Since I have two kids and a full-time job, time isn’t something I have a lot of.  So when I do manage to have an hour or so, I know I have to make it count since there’s no telling when I’ll have that gap again.

Q: Would you tell us your story of getting “the call?”

Well, mine wasn’t a call—it was an email.  I got the email at 5am in the morning, and when I saw the words ‘CONGRATULATIONS’ and ‘CONTRACT’ I squealed like a teenage girl, and jumped on my husband like a crazy person.  Now, me acting crazy isn’t exactly a strange or rare occurrence, so my husband just kind of went along with it.  I’m thinking that maybe he thought I had something else in mind—*wink—but when I shoved my cellphone in his face he knew it couldn’t have been that since I’m not that kinky. LOL.

Q:  Where can readers find you on the World Wide Web?

Twitter:      @BellaJ_Author

Facebook:  www.facebook.com/BellaJ1983

Website:    http://bellajauthor.wix.com/sassy